IPPR information access report, Tweya reacts

February 26, 2018

IPPR published and launched a report titled “Access Denied” in early December 2017. It contains the findings of access information, the survey of over 100 private, public, state-owned enterprises and civil society organizations.

The report says that 80 percent of all institutions and organizations did not respond or could not give the information requested. It also revealed that in 20 ministries approached for an information request, only five responded. Aside from these, additional results revealed that 60 percent of the respondents did not respond to the information request in an interesting way. Also, over 85 percent of those who participated were unresponsive to questions sent to them.

Moreover, only Erongo responded with the information requested out of 14 regions in a reasonable time. This information was instantly dismissed by Information minister Tjekero Tweyaa as he declares IPPR to have a malicious agenda against the government.

Tweya further explained that the findings were contradictory when he contacted the ministries mentioned in the report. He pointed out how IPPR cannot seem to provide a list of information, including the officials approached for the information.

“Regrettably, the IPPR could not contact the officials handling public information. For all we know, they might have contacted any official who happened to answer their query at that particular time. We feel that this was done deliberately to suit their malicious agenda,” he explained.

On the other hand, according to Namibian, IPPR director Graham Hopwood responded that the findings in the report were intended to “provide an opportunity for government and other sectors of Namibian society to identify weak points and best practices in the release of information.”

On February 7, Jane Mungabwa of the Action Namibia Coalition secretariat issued a statement in support of the IPPR and its report. Mungabwa called on minister Tweya to give immediate attention to the issue of government level access to information and to see the IPPR report as an indicator of the urgency for an access to information law in Namibia.

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#Information Access