BSE launches ‘chatbot’, “Ask Motabhai” for access to stock market information

August 2, 2018

According to Digit, BSE has introduced a chatbot, Ask Motabhai, which is built using ShepHertz Applied AI Services on Microsoft’s Artificial Intelligence platform. The chatbot helps provide customized, on-demand information to investors from BSE’s information base. In addition to stock prices and corporate news, visitors to the BSE website look for information on various financial instruments like mutual funds, derivatives, and IPOs.

Read the press release below:

BSE in partnership with Microsoft and Shephertz today announced the launch of ‘Ask Motabhai’, an Artificial Intelligence-based ‘chatbot’,  to provide on-demand data and information from the stock exchange’s website. BSE makes available on its website (www.bseindia.com) information on stock price, corporate results, and announcements, in real-time, of over 5,000 companies listed on the exchange. In order to make it convenient and faster for investors, especially small, retail investors, to get stock and market information, BSE has introduced an AI-based chatbot “Ask Motabhai” which can have a text-based conversation with the user and mine the BSE website to give customized information. The ‘chatbot’ has been built using the Microsoft Bot Framework, Cognitive Services, QnA Maker and Language Understanding Intelligent Service on Microsoft Azure cloud.

In addition to stock prices and corporate news, visitors to the BSE website look for information on various financial instruments like mutual funds, derivatives, and IPOs. The ‘chatbot’ is hence programmed to address market-related queries, like “what are the new IPOs?” and “which stocks are trading at their 52 weeks high?” in addition to the capability to address queries related to corporate actions and a stock’s price.

Speaking on the occasion, Ashishkumar Chauhan, MD & CEO, BSE said, “We are proud to announce the launch of BSE’s own chatbot ‘Ask MotaBhai’. BSE has always been at the forefront of the adoption of technology-based advancements.

Access to Information Unit has launched new booklet

May 9, 2018

According to Jamaica Information Service, the access to information unit has launched the youth information booklet entitled “Abby and Friends ATI Adventure” last March 26. The launching was held at the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Library, Tom Redcam Drive, in Kingston.

The report described how the publication ushers the readers to a knowledgeable adventure like FAQs (Frequently asked questions) and activity sections. Hon. Floyd Green embraced the publication during his speech, encouraging the Unit to partner with the HEART Trust/NTA in creating an animated format of the book. Mr. Green is the State Minister in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information.

“Here we can tell the story through animation. We have a youth digitization project at the HEART Trust/NTA with some excellent young animators. Why not let us bring Abby to life. So, yes they can read the book, but imagine if we could also pop in a video that we can play,” Mr. Green said.

“This is something that the Ministry of Education will be willing to partner on, and that is something I believe we should do as the next step,” he added. Meanwhile, Acting Director, Access to Information Unit, Tomica Daley, said following the implementation of the ATI in 2004, the Government, through the ATI Unit, has sought to create awareness of the Act and encourage the various publics to utilize it, where to buy liquor.

“Consequently, the Unit identified the youth cohort as significant participants as early democratic participation is integral to shaping our future,” Mrs. Daley said. She noted that the idea for the publication came about in 2016 when the team at the Unit recognized that it had little promotional material relating to the youth.

“When we conducted school public education outreach, children and youth often had to be provided with materials designated for adults, specifically the adult brochure and copies of the law. Naturally, this affected our ability to generate interest among this very important cohort, our youth, and so we concluded that there must be another way,” the Acting Director said.

Supreme Court disregards right to access medical information

May 2, 2018

According to Rewire, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday heard oral arguments in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra, the case challenging a California law that mandates certain disclosures for reproductive health-care facilities. Passed in 2015, the Reproductive Freedom Accountability Comprehensive Care and Transparency (FACT) Act is, at its core, a truth-in-advertising law—but it has become a proxy for conservatives’ war on reproductive health science.

The law places two different requirements on clinics in the state. Licensed clinics must post a notice that the state provides low-cost contraception and abortion services to those who qualify; unlicensed facilities must disclose that they are unlicensed. But just before the law was set to take effect, attorneys from the conservative litigation mill Alliance Defending Freedom sued on behalf of a group of licensed and unlicensed anti-choice “crisis pregnancy centers” (CPCs). They argued the law was not a regulation to protect consumers, but instead an unconstitutional attack on CPC free speech rights—because it forced these businesses to convey a “pro-abortion” message with which they disagree. Both a lower court and the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed and upheld the law. But as oral arguments closed Tuesday, those rulings appeared to be in jeopardy, liquor stores.

Attorney Michael Farris from ADF took to the podium first, telling the justices that California lawmakers “took aim” at CPCs in drafting the FACT Act by making them “point the way” to abortion clinics in the state. This framing—that the law targets CPCs and no one else—is an essential component to ADF’s challenge and one Farris stuck to throughout his time before the Court. It may prove to be a winning strategy. He claimed lawmakers “gerrymandered” the law, drafting what looked to be a neutral regulation but one that was in reality riddled with exceptions that left only CPCs exposed to enforcement.

NAI journalists in Kabul discriminated from access to information

April 24, 2018

The free media advocacy group called NAI accused the government last Monday how they tighten the grip of accessing the information. NAI believes that they are making things hard for the media people, experiencing difficulties to collect details.

In line with this, the head of NAI named Abdul Mujib Khilwatgar revealed during a press conference held in Kabul how the government was hesitant to provide satisfactory information to journalists. Therefore, Khilwatgar says it is a violation of the law on access to information, the Liquor store near me.

What is more frustrating is that government never responds to journalists’ telephone calls and even the people receiving phone calls on their behalf are being tortured. Khilwatgar adds how the government deals with the local media differently as they only behave to foreign media.

“Government spokespersons only respond in yes and no to questions from journalists and provide no satisfactory answers. This discrimination between local and foreign media is against the media law and the law on access to information,” Khilwatgar explained.

“Some government offices demand official letters from journalists to allow them access to information. For example, the Ministry of Women’s Affairs and the Ministry of Transport, as well as hospitals and schools, ask journalists for an official letter. This causes people to remain unaware of the real situation,” Khilwatgar further shared.

Moreover, denying journalists and media’s right to access information only means the government is depriving people as well from the information. This is the reason why the citizens don’t trust the regime anymore. Aside from this, the government does not allow reporters too to ride military convoys to the country’s remote area.

The NAI head is also concerned about media outlets that were influenced by the government. They had nothing to say but only favorable things.

The president’s deputy spokesman, Dawa Khan Minapal, said that the government was committed to implementing the law on access to information. About NAI concerns, according to Pajhwok, he said: “The access to information law has recently been amended to relax access to information, but the media should also cooperate with the government in enforcing this law.”

Access Information from the Government

January 16, 2018
Access Information

Peter St. Cyr, the executive director of the foundation for the Open Government in New Mexico said that  “Transparent governments always are more efficient when citizens can identify waste, fraud, and abuse and hold public officials accountable” especially when the officials want to use chase bank to store their loots

Lawmakers instructed public servants to make providing public information a routine daily duty before they declared the Inspection of Public Records Act state policy. However, NMFOG’s open government hotline rings several times a day. Callers are seeking assistance when their requests for public documents are often delayed. The Sunshine laws of New Mexico is not always firm.

On one hand, NMFOG compliance audit two years ago unveiled taxpayers are harassed for attorneys’ fees and damage awards. Since New Mexico’s Sunshine laws received a failing score in the Center for Public Integrity State Integrity Investigation in 2015, this is not a surprise.

Two years later, nothing has been done to close the so-called ‘enforcement gap.’  Opportunities have been misused but in her final budget, NMFOG encourages Gov. Susana Martinez vouches to budget for resources and technology, which removes the administrative code loophole in the “otherwise provided by law” exception has NMFOG’s support again this year.

As of early January, the average rate for a single-sided black and white copy was 16 cents. Unfortunately, Citizens’ access to the legislative process is less than transparent. NMFOG tells legislative leaders to obtain technology that tracks changes in proposed legislation and require committee staff to post-hearing agendas 24 hours in advance.

Furthermore, financial deals place taxpayers on the hook should be disclosed and decided in properly noticed public meetings. It has been two years as well since the Legislative Finance Committee recommends lawmakers to establish minimum job qualifications and mandate annual training programs for records custodians. Open government is always Germaine, let’s rally the governor to put it on her call.